Gustavo Thomas Butoh Vlog

A Butoh Artist Video and Photo Journal

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-It has a life completely of his own.-

"When I was trying in despair the other day to paint that head of a specific person, I used a very big brush and a great deal or paint and I put it on very, very freely, and I simply didn’t know in the end what I was doing, and suddenly this thing clicked, and became exactly like this image I was trying to record. But not out of any conscious will, nor was it anything to do with illustrational painting. What has never yet analyzed is why this particular way of painting is more poignant than illustration. I suppose because it has a life completely of its own. It lives on its own, and therefore transfers the essence of the image more poignantly. So that the artist may be able to open up or rather, should I say, unlock the valves of feeling and therefore return the onlooker to life more violently."

No doubt why Hijikata saw inspiration in Bacon’s work, it seems to describe a way of creating in Butoh.

Francis Bacon

(Interviews with David Sylvester)

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gustavothomas:

"When in Tokyo I photographed him (Kazuo Ohno) in the street wearing a dress. He told me that he was inspired by Jean Genet’s novel, Notre Dame de Fleurs. I showed the series to Jean Genet. (…) We were friends. He came to my house one night. I said, "Look, I took some photos in Japan. This dancer says that he was influenced by your book." Genet’s reply was that he didn’t understand. (…) Genet belonged to a different sphere. I don’t think he knew much about dance." (William Klein about the photographs he took of Tatsumi Hijikata, Kazuo Ohno and Yoshito Ohno in a street performance in Shinjuku, 1960)

gustavothomas:

"When in Tokyo I photographed him (Kazuo Ohno) in the street wearing a dress. He told me that he was inspired by Jean Genet’s novel, Notre Dame de Fleurs. I showed the series to Jean Genet. (…) We were friends. He came to my house one night. I said, "Look, I took some photos in Japan. This dancer says that he was influenced by your book." Genet’s reply was that he didn’t understand. (…) Genet belonged to a different sphere. I don’t think he knew much about dance." (William Klein about the photographs he took of Tatsumi Hijikata, Kazuo Ohno and Yoshito Ohno in a street performance in Shinjuku, 1960)